Category Archives: Nostalgia

Audio Quiz (Part 3): Popular Indian Ad Jingles (contd)

This is the third of my audio quizzes. The first was on theme songs from Indian tv serials and the second one on ad jingles. Today, I am offering the third of those quizzes. The theme of this one is again popular TV ad jingles- mostly from the 80s and 90s. Many of them originally appeared on Doordarshan while some bled over to satellite TV. This should be relatively easy (expecting a lot of 10/10s here) than the TV serial one. After this we have dialogues from movies- tamil, hindi, and english.

lalitaji surf ad

Moving on to today’s quiz, here we go. Same rules of the game (copied and pasted from the previous quizzes):

Rules of the Game:

Each clip is about 30 seconds long with some rare exceptions. Here is how you can play it and keep it interesting for everyone else too.

  1. Listen to each of these clips and make a note of your answers.
  2. Once you are ready, message me your responses.
  3. While you are at it, would love to hear your feedback on how the quiz was and how I can make the next few episodes better.
  4. If you can, do respond to the original posting on Facebook or Google Plus with the fact that you sent me the answers. I will respond back with your score.
  5. Please come back for future episodes of the quiz.

Past Quizzes

1. Audio Quiz- Part 1: TV Serial Theme songs

2. Audio Quiz- Part 2: Popular Indian TV ad jingles (1-10)

 

Audio Quiz (Part 2): Popular Indian ad jingles

Earlier this week, I published the first of a few audio quizzes I had prepared for a family Diwali event. Today, I am offering the second of those quizzes. The theme of this one is popular TV ad jingles- mostly from the 80s and 90s. Many of them originally appeared on Doordarshan while some bled over to satellite TV. This should be much easier (expecting a lot of 10/10s here) than the TV serial one. I have 10 more of the ad set which I will publish in a few days.

The response for the first quiz was interesting. On one hand,  analytics tells me that over a hundred people viewed the post and most of them spent a good amount of time on the page meaning- atleast heard a few of the audio clips. But the actual number of people who took the quiz was much lesser- closer to 10-15%. This tells me one of two things – either the quiz was too hard and folks felt they would not fare well or that it was boring and not worth an attempt. If it was the former, I would like to clear the air- any score is a good score. That is why I ask people to message me in private. Also, it is all for fun. If its the second, would like to hear your feedback on how it could be more interesting.

goldspot

Moving on to today’s quiz, here we go. Same rules of the game (copied and pasted from the previous quiz):

Rules of the Game:

Each clip is about 30 seconds long with some rare exceptions. Here is how you can play it and keep it interesting for everyone else too.

  1. Listen to each of these clips and make a note of your answers.
  2. Once you are ready, message me your responses.
  3. While you are at it, would love to hear your feedback on how the quiz was and how I can make the next few episodes better.
  4. If you can, do respond to the original posting on Facebook or Google Plus with the fact that you sent me the answers. I will respond back with your score.
  5. Please come back for future episodes of the quiz.

 

Audio Quiz (Part 1): TV serial theme songs

Every once in a while, we are reminded of our childhood back in India. Of TV serials and funny ads and iconic movie dialogues. Well, here is your chance to relive that age.

I recently conducted a small audio quiz for a bunch of family members visiting for Deepavali. The topics were:

  1. Hindi movie dialogue clips
  2. Tamil movie dialogue clips
  3. English movie dialogue clips
  4. Indian TV ad jingles
  5. Indian TV serial theme song snippets

I had a phenomenal time just preparing the quiz. I spent hours across multiple nights listening to hundreds of movie dialogues, ad jingles and TV show theme songs to narrow down to a few simple ones that are instantly recognizable, yet fun. I was swept in a wave of nostalgia. I publicly mused on Facebook if I could post it online after the event and here is my attempt at it.

If the first quiz has a good response, I will post the rest over the next few weeks in bite sized chunks.

Caveat:

If you are a copyright holder and think a clip should not be here, please let me know. I will remove it. The intention here is solely for the enjoyment of the audience and in the process, rekindle interest in the movie/TV show/product.

Rules of the Game:

Each clip is about 30 seconds long with some rare exceptions. Here is how you can play it and keep it interesting for everyone else too.

  1. Listen to each of these clips and make a note of your answers.
  2. Once you are ready, message me your responses.
  3. While you are at it, would love to hear your feedback on how the quiz was and how I can make the next few episodes better.
  4. If you can, do respond to the original posting on Facebook or Google Plus with the fact that you sent me the answers. I will respond back with your score.
  5. Please come back for future episodes of the quiz.

Quiz 1: TV Serial Theme songs

 

 

 

 

The Mangalyaan Playlist: Songs that inspire and motivate

On the 24th of September 2014, India succesfully launched its Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM), Mangalyaan into Mars orbit. This is a huge step for India in terms of demonstrating its engineering chops on a shoe string budget. As an Indian, it makes me proud and more so as an engineer. This is a testament to sheer hard work and innovation. To that effect, I want to present a short playlist that I am calling the Mangalyaan Playlist. These are a handful of songs that have and continue to inspire and motivate me when I need it the most. This is by no means a comprehensive collection. I look forward to hearing songs that I missed from readers and fans of such music.

Tagore

1. Ekla Chalo Re written by Rabindranath Tagore. Performed by various.

Over the past few weeks, I have been listening (all over again) to a bunch of versions of the classic “Ekla Chalo” by Rabindranath Tagore. Tagore, the doyen of Bengali writing and one of the key freedom fighters with the pen, wrote this song in 1905. It was originally meant to be a patriotic song but the lyrics and timeless and universal. Sample this:

If they turn away, and desert you when crossing the wilderness,
O thou unlucky one,
trample the thorns under thy tread,
and along the blood-lined track travel alone.

There have been many versions of the song over the years. The one I like the most is the one by popular Rabindra Sangeet singer, Suchitra Mitra. This unique Youtube video captures her singing three versions of the song over a few decades.  An equally remarkable rendition by Kishore Kumar can be heard here. Amitabh Bachchan sang a version for a recent movie, Kahaani where his voice does its magic. Shreya Ghoshal has a nice version here.

2. Jaage hain der tak by Gulzar. Composed by A.R.Rahman and sung by A.R.Rahman and Chitra

Here is a song from the movie “Guru” based on the life of Indian business tycoon Dhirubhai Ambani. Manirathnam and A.R.Rahman weave magic with some outstanding words by Gulzar. The soaring orchestral arrangement for the song is only matched by the soothing voice of Chitra and the raw emotion of A.R.Rahman’s own.

Here is a all of the translated lyrics. The simplicity of the lyrics belies the power it wields over the listener.

Long awake.. let me sleep for some more time
There’s still some night left.. let the morning come
Half and incomplete dreams.. that could never come true
Let me, in my sleep.. weave those dreams again

3. Hum Honge Kamyaab written by Girija Kumar Mathur. Composed by Vanraj Bhatia and sung by various. Original- “We shall overcome” by Pete Seeger.

This song has its origin in the West with the iconic civil rights protest song by Pete Seeger, “We shall overcome.” The original English version has great lyrics and the shorter Hindi version captures the gist of it. The most popular rendition of the Hindi version comes from the movie “Jaane Bhi Do Yaaro” with music by Vanraj Bhatia.

We’re on to victory, We’re on to victory,
We’re on to victory someday;
Oh, deep in my heart, I do believe,
We’re on to victory someday.

4. Unnal Mudiyum Thambi written by Pulamaipithan.

Composed by Ilayaraja and sung by S.P.Balasubramaniam.
Over the years, whenever I have needed a song to motivate and drive me to work harder than ever before, I have looked to this song from the movie, “Unnal Mudiyum Thambi.” The reasons are two fold. The lyrics by Pulamaipithan in my native language, Tamizh are simple and to the point. The song was composed by Maestro Illayaraja and set to tune in one of my favorite Carnatic Ragas, Hindolam. Hindolam turns out to be an excellent choice for the song’s strong message.

Here is a sampling of the lyrics roughly translated into English:

You can do it lad,
If you believe in the you inside you.
Lift your shoulder,
And lift the country falling asleep

5. Vellipanimalayin Medhulavuvom written by Mahakavi Bharathiyaar. Composed by G.Ramanathan and sung by Tiruchi Loganathan and Seerkazhi Govindarajan

kappalottiya thamizhanKappalottiya Tamizhan

I grew up reading the works of freedom fighter and poet extraordinaire Mahakavi Bharathiyaar. I wrote about his remarkable work here.  No amount of accolades are sufficient to cover the body of work Bharathiyaar produced. I could list a whole lot of songs he composed that inspire and motivate me to this day. But if I were to pick one that stands out in the light of Mangalyaan’s success, it is this. A piece composed by the brilliant G.Ramanathan for the patriotic movie, Kappalottiya Tamizhan featuring actor par extraordinaire Sivaji Ganesan as V.O.Chidambaram Pillai.

6. Ini Acham Acham Illai from Indira. Written by Vairamuthu. Composed by A.R.Rahman. Sung by Anuradha Sriram and group

Indira was the first movie directed by Suhasini Manirathnam, actor and wife of prominent director Manirathnam. It was an interesting movie possibly ahead of its time. But it featured some very good music by A.R.Rahman. One song that stands out for me is “Ini Acham Acham Illai“. It is a complex composition that has a great chorus backing Anuradha Sriram and a few other kids singing a positive piece about having no fear- echoing Bharathiyaar’s original Achamillai achamillai.

And topical enough for today, a child in the song goes,

“That moon, that moon, run and bring it over here,

The butterfly flies, is man any less capable, if we fly higher someday we will touch the skies”

7. Title song from umpteen Rajinikanth movies. Composed by Ilayaraaja, Deva and A.R.Rahman and written by Vairamuthu, Vali and more. Sung often by S.P.B and occasionally others.

I am an unabashed Rajinikanth fan for very many reasons. But one of them is the strong and positive message he delivers through his punch lines and songs in his movies. As corny and cliched some of them are, they still strike a chord in you and I am forever thankful for the star and everyone involved in those songs. I will suggest a few of them here as there are way too many to list.

1. Vetri Kodi Kattu from Padayappa

2. Oruvan Oruvan Mudhalali from Muthu

3. Singam Ondru from Arunachalam

4. Sakthi Kodu from Baba

5. Vetri Nichayam from Annamalai

As always, a youtube playlist with all these songs and more is available for your viewing and listening pleasure.

Carnatic Music in Malayalam cinema

I grew up in the city of Coimbatore, not too far from the Tamil Nadu-Kerala border.  I had and continue to have a lot of Malayalee and Tamilalee friends. I never quite picked up the language but given the context, could make heads or tails in the conversation.

In the late eighties and early nineties, Malayalam cinema was going through its golden period. Every other movie made its way to the National Awards and Mohanlal, Mamooty and a slew of actors held center stage. While I didnt really watch very many Malayalam movies, one thing that I took to was their soundtrack. It would not be a stretch to say that in the last three decades, there has not been a better showcase of Carnatic music than in Malayalam movies.

How did this happen? One could start with the voices – Yesudas who stormed into the scene around the same time. There were others like Neyyatinkara Vasudevan, Jayachandran and S.Janaki who also made waves. Yesudas subsequently brought in M.G.Sreekumar and Kavikuyil Chitra. Malayalam music directors of the time had a keen ear for Carnatic music- G.DevarajanM. Raveendran, M.G. Radhakrishnan, Johnson, and Illayaraja.  The musical nature of some of the movies at the time – Bharatam, Chitram, His Highness Abdullah, Sargam, Sopanam, Manichitrathazhu, Swathi Thirunal and many more was either the cause or the result of this magic. In this post, I will present a really small set of those spectacular movie soundtracks that continue to hold sway over me.

1. Swathi Thirunal

swathithirunal

This is what I would call a full Carnatic soundtrack. A movie that was critically panned for its theme, it nevertheless featured an all star vocal cast including Neyyattinkara Vasudevan, Chitra, Yesudas, S.P.B, Balamurali Krishna and more. This M.B.Sreenivasan album is one of my all time favorites and it a huge challenge to pick a single favorite. Be it the Charukesi piece by Yesudas, or Kanada by Neyyatinkara or the Vasantha piece by Yesudas and Neyyatinkara or the Misra Pilu piece sung gorgeously by Balamurali or the Dhanasri thillana by M.G.Sreekumar, each one is a gem.  But for the sake of this post, I would like to put forth this short yet impactful Darbari Kanada piece by SPB – Devanuke Pathi.

2. Sargam

sargam

I never got to see this movie but I heard it was good. What I did hear (many times over) was its soundtrack.  Featuring music by Bombay Ravi, this movie was built around music as its central theme and it shows. K.J.Yesudas and Chitra pretty much owned and dominated the album with such pieces like Raaga Sudha rasa (Aandholika), Pravahame.  My personal favorite is the wonderful Kedaragowla piece, Aandholanam.

3. Bharatham

Bharatham

Yet another Raveendran-Mohanlal combo that did wonders. The movie with its dark theme was a popular hit and went on to win National Awards. A movie that showcased the price of fame in Carnatic music and what it does to relationships, it featured some awesome music by Raveendran.  The selection here includes Rama Katha Ganalayam (pivotal moment in the movie driven by KJY’s excellent rendition), the great Shankarabharanam piece, Raghuvamsapathe and the Nattai piece Gopangane. My personal pick here is the Hamsadwani piece by K.J.Y, Sree Vinayakam.

4. Chithram

chitram

This is one movie I did get to see. A serious start segues into a humorous middle only to climax on a not so happy note. All that aside, the movie’s breezy middle portion has some hidden gems. This was a huge hit back then and the Kannur Rajan scored music was a big contributor. Two nice pieces here are the romantic piece that is still rooted in Madhyamavathi, Eeran Megham and the M.G.Sreekumar rendered Dikshithar krithi in Nattai, Swami Nadha. But the standout here is the fantastic rendition of Thyagaraja’s Abheri gem, Nagumo by Neyyattinkara Vasudevan and M.G.Sreekumar.

5.  His Highness Abdullah

hha

One can argue that this maybe the benchmark against which all Carnatic themed Malayalam film music could be measured. And as a movie, it standouts as a remarkable classical music based enterprise from Pranavam Arts. A Raveendran soundtrack rich in classical tones for a movie rooted in the same art form, it was a joy to watch and to listen. With good pieces in the form of Pramadhanam Vendum, and the Kanada piece, Nadharoopini gloriously rendered by M.G.S and much more, there was a lot to enjoy. The standout song though was Deva Sabhathalam featuring Yesudas / M.G.Sreekumar in two versions, Raveendran master and Sharath. Even today, I get goosebumps listening to this piece.

As I made my way through this list, I realized it would not really fit in one post. So I will defer the rest of the selection to a second post for a future date. And no better way to conclude this post than with the final lines from the song, “Anandam Ananthanandham Jagadanandam Sangeetham”

As always, a full Youtube playlist with pretty much all the songs featured in this post are available here. Enjoy.

Andha Naal Gnyabagam – Music in my college days (Part 4)

With less than 24  hours to go for the largest alumni gathering of PSG Tech outside India, we are down to the final post in this series- the songs that made an impact during my final year in college. The PSG Tech alumni event, M4M is fully sold out and features the singing talents from over the years at Tech.  Without further ado, here are the songs that made it big in the 1999-2000 time frame.

 1999

After a Spring loaded with big hits, we entered our final year of college, hopeful of a job, an admit to a good university abroad and a ton of fun with friends- one last time.  A job was the first thing in mind from the first day of college. Campus interviews kicked in instantly and the focus was all on that. But there was always time for music – be it while celebrating someone getting a job or waiting hopefully for the interview call after the written test or getting over that day’s dejection and preparing for the next day’s written test in the morning.

June did not have very many releases – Vijay had a movie with Isha Koppikar called Nenjinile. While the movie went nowhere, there was one standout song that was very hummable – Manase Manase. The big release for July was ARR’s compositions for Kadhir’s Kadhalar Dhinam. The movie was pretty bad by any standard but a couple of songs stuck around in the cassette recorders in the hostel for a while. Oh Maria was a internet generation piece (pretty amusing to look back at it now). Enna Vilai Azhage was the best piece of the lot.

In what now seems like a very rare occurrence, ARR had two releases in the same month- Kadhalar Dhinam and Sangamam. The latter was a Suresh Krishna dance musical that ended up failing at the box office. ARR had some good classical and folk compositions that were quite popular- it wasn’t the college type songs but there were so many ARR fans then that it did not matter. Mazhai Thuli,  and Varaha Nadhi karai oram were two good songs from Sangamam.

August 15th brought Bharadwaj’s music for Saran’s Amarkalam. Two SPB songs made it very big – Megangal and Satham illadha. The gaanaish Mahaganapathi piece featuring dance master Lawrence was quite popular too. With final year love stories abound, Amarkalam songs were huge.

ARR reused some of his music from hindi for a tamil movie, Jodi and while the songs were not upto ARR’s high standards of the day, they were still pretty popular. Of note were Kai Thatti thatti and Velli Malare.  And then there was a lull of good music for a couple of months.

November again brought two ARR releases. Both of them were huge musically. The first was Shankar’s megahit Mudhalvan. This was a typical Shankar movie with a strong message packaged in an audience friendly masala manner and the songs were huge – be it the Sushmitha Sen dance piece Shakalaka Baby, or the romantic number Azhagana Rakshasiye, or the lavishly mounted title song.

The second November ARR release was the debut of Bharathiraaja’s son Manoj in Tajmahal. A horrific movie by every possible standard, it featured some hummable village tunes with a modern twist by ARR. Three songs stood out and made it big at Tech – Kulirudhu, Sotta Sotta and the addictive Thirupachi.


December brought with it a landmark Tamil movie from a debutant director and the relaunch of a big star, Vikram. Bala’s Sethu arrived in December and completely took over. Everyone was talking about the movie and its music by the Maestro. Illayaraja gave a huge soundtrack with songs that suited the overall feel of the movie. Some of the notable songs were Maalai Yen,   Sikkadha Sittondru and the hugely popular Kaana Karunguyile.


2000

Ilayaraaja continued his hit streak after Sethu with two musical hits in January 2000. The first was a movie called Kadhal Rojave. The movie was forgettable but for two hummable and popular tunes- Izhavenil Idhu and Ninaitha Varam Kettu.  Fazil tried to repeat his Kadhalukku Mariyadhai success story with Vijay and Shalini in Kannukul Nilavu. The movie didn’t live up to its expectations but had some relatively popular songs- Roja Poondhottam and Oru naal oru kanavu.

February saw Raaja’s big season continue with his brilliant score for Kamal Hassan’s magnum opus, Hey Ram. The movie bombed but the songs were just fantastic. The romantic piece Nee Partha Paarvaikku was awesome as was the period piece, Isayil Thodangudhamma and the controversial title piece. To me though, the one song that captured the entire gamut of musical composition and being the right fit for the scene is Vaishnava Janato. I wrote an entire post about this song and I cant recommend it enough.

February saw a big hit for Deva in the form of Mugavari. Some of the songs were lifted from other sources but the songs were very successful  and college audience friendly nevertheless.  Of note were Hey Keechu Kiliye, A Nilave, and Oh Nenje Nenje.

All of this was soon going to be engulfed in the monster hit that was to be Alaipayuthey. Manirathnam’s ode to love and the ups and downs of marriage was a huge success with the younger crowd. It was a rage in college and ARR’s music topped the charts in a big way. Every single song was a mega hit and it is almost impossible to pick one over the other. From the title piece Endrendrum Punnagai to Swarnalatha’s soulful rendition in Evano Oruvan to  the colorful Pachai Nirame and the utterly gorgeous Snehidane, everything was just fantastic. To me though, two songs standout even amidst these awesome pieces – the small but utterly divine Mangalyam Thanthunanena and the playfully sexy Kadhal Sadugudu.

Nothing that year was going to stand up to Alaipayuthey. That much was certain. In the waning days of my undergrad life and in the company of my future wife, this was all that I could have asked for. The only thing that came close before I left college was another ARR soundtrack- one that was steeped in melody and simplicity, Kandukondain Kandukondain. Rajeev Menon’s gorgeous take on Austen’s Sense and Sensibility was given the best support by ARR’s music. Be it the Shankar Mahadevan sung Enna Seyya Pogirai or the peppy Konjum Mainakkale or the retrospective Enge Yenadhu or the Hariharan title track Kandukondain Kandukondain, the songs were simple yet spectacular. My personal favorite was and continues to be the Chitra piece, Kannamoochi Yenada.  The Yesudas-Chitra duet version of the same song sounds even better.

With Alaipayuthey and Kandukondain, I left college. Four years of friendship and memories. Never before and never again would life be the same. I will sign off here. In less than 10 hours, the stage for the evening alumni event will start getting set. I will get to meet friends, old and new and hopefully relive some of these wonderful memories of my college life through the music.

Hope all of you enjoyed this walk down memory lane as much as I did, putting it together for you (and me). I thoroughly loved this project- so many memories came flooding back. The feeling was just awesome.

As always, the public Youtube playlist with all the songs featured in this series of posts can be found here. Enjoy.

Posts in this Series:

Andha Naal Gnyabagam-Music in my college days (Part 1)

Andha Naal Gnyabagam- Music in my college days (Part 2)

Andha Naal Gnyabagam- Music in my college days (Part 3)

Andha Naal Gnyabagam – Music in my college days (Part 3)

We are less than a week away from the biggest gathering of PSG Tech alumni outside India. And I am counting down to the event with a series of posts on tamil film music in my college days. Over the last few days, we covered my freshman year and sophomore year and the songs that made it to the popularity charts then. We are now on to my junior year in college. This was the year I met my wife for the first time. So you can imagine this being a special year for us and the music made it all the more memorable.

1998

Over the summer of 98, the biggest hit was Priyamudan. This Vijay thriller was a big hit and the songs continued to echo in the college when we got back from our break. Deva was inspired by a whole slew of musical sources for his compositions for Priyamudan. The one that made it big was Bharathikku Kannamma. Vijay continued to have his share of hits with Nilave Vaa. With two heroines to choose from and a college setting to boot, the movie had some popular songs. The songs with air time were Nee Katru and Nilave Nilave.

This brings us to one gentleman named S.A.Rajkumar. S.A.R made his bones composing for Vikraman, he of the brother/sister/big family/village sentiment. In 1998, Vikraman made one such weepy emotional drama featuring Karthik called Unnidathil Ennai Koduthen. And true to form, SAR composed a song Edho Oru Pattu, which played and played everywhere you went. In buses, in the radio, in the TV and what not until you had enough of it.

September brought a big hit for Prashanth and Simran in the form of Kannedhirey Thondrinal. It also had a strong friendship theme to it with Prashanth and Karan and ended up being very popular among the college crowd. Quite a few of Deva’s songs made it pretty big like Salomiya, Kothal Savadi and Kanave Kalayadhe. The biggest one in college was Eshwara. The rest of the year did not have a big enough hit to surpass Deva’s gaana songs for Kannedhirey Thondrinal.

For the rest of the calendar year, there was not much to croon. Sollamale was a surprise hit with Livingston and Kausalya and had some decent songs but nothing to write about. The last decent hit of the year was Ilayaraja’s tunes for Agathiyan’s Kadhal Kavithai. The movie, an attempt to cash in on the fame of late Diana had some popular songs like Alana Naal Mudhala and Diana Diana but the movie itself was no big shakes.

1999

As if to compensate for the slim pickings in the last part of 1998, the next year opened up big and stayed big all Spring and summer until we left for the summer break. The first major hit for the year was the Vijay-Simran starrer Thulladha Manamum Thullum. A weepy romantic movie, it had superhit romantic songs that made it pretty big like Thodu Thodu, Innisai Padi varum and Iruvadhu Kodi.  But the biggest was Megamai Vandhu.

The year was just getting started. In a few weeks from when Vijay and Simran were rocking the charts, came Deva’s gaana magnum opus Ninaivirukkum Varai. This movie starring Prabhu Deva is not remembered as much for the  story or any such as much as it was for its two massive gaana hits- Kathadikkudhu Kathadikkudhu and Thirupathi Ezhumalai.

The end of February brought the long delayed Arvind Swamy starrer with ARR’s music in En Swaasa Katre. En Swaasa Katre did average business at the box office but given the Rahman rage going around town, the songs like Jumbalika, and Thirakkadha were quite popular. The biggest hit was Chinna Chinna mazhai thuligal but my personal favorite was SPB and Chitra’s Theendai.

March was a quite month because of the monster that was to follow. Rajinikanth’s movies were big, whichever you looked at it. In the media, around town and all over college, the songs from a Rajini movie were heard, period. Throw in ARR’s music and you had a heady concoction. And if were to be a monster hit like Padayappa, you can only imagine. Padayappa stormed the screens in early April and vanished all competition. For the romantic at heart, there was Suthi Suthi, a tantalizing piece by SPB. For the ones looking for motivation, there was Vetri Kodi Kattu.  For the Rajini intro song, there was Singa Nadai pottu. But the song that made it to the top of the pile was the lazy philosophical piece, Kikku Yeruthey.

The last few months of my third year in college had brought a surfeit of hits but it was not all done. The last major hit for that spring was the Ajith-Simran-Jyothika starrer Vaali. With its taut script and Deva’s tunes, the movie went head to head with Padayappa and did well. The movie had some great songs which made it very big in college – April Madhathil, Nilavai Konduvaa and more. The biggest of course was the Ajith-Jyothika piece, O Sona.

After a relatively timid start to the academic year, the quality and quantity of popular songs picked up  as the year progressed culminating in some major hits. It was a great year to be in college and the songs made it all the more special. Later this week, in the last and final post in this series, I will revisit the songs that made it big in my final year in college. Stay tuned.

As always, the public Youtube playlist with all the songs featured in this series of posts can be found here. Enjoy.

Posts in this Series:

Andha Naal Gnyabagam-Music in my college days (Part 1)

Andha Naal Gnyabagam- Music in my college days (Part 2)

Andha Naal Gnyabagam- Music in my college days (Part 4)